Thursday, February 21, 2019

30 Wonderful Photos of the Brave Women of the U.S. Army Nurse Corps During Vietnam War

The history of the Army Nurse Corps (ANC) in Vietnam began in April, 1956 when three Army nurses arrived in Saigon, Republic of Vietnam. These nurses were on temporary duty assignments attached to the United States Army Medical Training Team, United States Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG), Saigon. The Army sent them to train South Vietnamese nurses in nursing care procedures and techniques, not care for U.S. servicemen.

Instead, the American Embassy Dispensary in Saigon provided care for the American Community and the MAAG advisers. By 1959, however, that facility could no longer meet its mounting requirements. Medical and dental personnel of the U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force augmented a team redesignated as the American Dispensary, Saigon. This tri-service staffing arrangement, including two Army Nurse Corps officers, continued for the next three years.

The expansion of the war in the Republic of Vietnam placed greater burdens on the Army Nurse Corps. Over 11 years from March, 1962 (when the 8th Field Hospital opened in Nha Trang) to March, 1973 (when the last Army nurses departed the Republic of Vietnam), more than 5,000 Army nurses served in America’s longest war.

The buildup in Vietnam taxed the Corps. Army nurses had to provide full peacetime nursing services in the continental United States and Europe yet simultaneously meet the far different requirements of
combat forces fighting in Southeast Asia. In January, 1965 the Army had 113 hospital beds and 15 nurses in Vietnam. The buildup of medical units was completed in 1968 and included 11 Reserve and National Guard medical units. By December 1968, 900 nurses in Vietnam worked in 23 Army hospitals, and one convalescent center with a total of 5,283 beds.

Army nurses volunteered for duty in Vietnam for a variety of reasons. Many felt it was their patriotic
duty; others thought of Vietnam as an adventure. One nurse veteran remarked: “We aren’t angels, We are simply members of the nursing profession who have seen the need in Vietnam and are here to do our part.” Another said: “I wanted to be an army nurse and combat is where the soldier is. That’s where I wanted to be.” And a third: “My reason for going was that there were American troops there that needed help. They needed the things that I could give them in my nursing profession."





























































































































81 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for your service and dedication. I wish you all peace. I can't help but think of the horrors you have been through and the lives that you changed for the better. God Bless you and keep you.

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  2. Wow, these women were true heroines. Thank you for your service!

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  3. My picture is not here, but I was there.

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    1. They did an excellent job taking care of our wounded.

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    2. Brave women and I Salute all of you!

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    3. Thank you for your service. truly and sincerely

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  4. Salute, ladies! To me, you will always be heros. πŸ‘♥️πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ

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  5. My mom is in one of these photos! I’m so proud to be her daughter!!

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    1. You should be young lady. The horrors of war that these woman witnessed day in and day out took real heroes. I salute you , I thank you for your service .

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  6. I was there in Saigon then Chulai. I recognized Linda V.
    Cheryl Walker

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  7. So proud to have my picture along side these fellow nurses that served.

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  8. When I entered nursing school in 1965, that was my intent. I still think I could have made a difference ..............

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  9. Thank You! "Keep THEIR Memory Alive!" Each of you DID make a difference.

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  10. These pics are probably the only times they smiled

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    1. They smiled at me everyday of the week I spent in 23rd Surg

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  11. Outstanding pictures. The nurses went beyond the call of duty.

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  12. In the next to the last picture the nurse is wearing a 4th ID patch. My husband was 4th ID in Vietnam 1969. He was wounded and helicoptered out.
    Thanks to all the great nurses who were there and cared for our heroes!!

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  13. Having spent time in both US Army and US Navy hospitals in Vietnam, I say, without reservation, these women are all angels! Rich, USMC (RET)

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  14. God bless you all!!!! Thank you!

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  15. Named my Niece after one named Tara...Dong Tam 1968-69 9th Infantry

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  16. The 22nd picture down is not a nurse. She was a news correspondent.

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    1. I believe you are correct. Her fatigues are different. She does not seem to be a nurse, rather she is interviewing the other person, she has a notepad/pen in her hands & cigarette.

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  17. God only knows where we'd be without them.

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  18. Absolutely, we thank the nurses! And the other women who served with the Red Cross, Special Services, and USO.

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  19. Love each and everyone! They are the true heroes! Thanks for being there for me!

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  20. thank you to the most beautiful girls in the world

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  21. Thank you ladies...you saved my life ..19 Jan. 1968 !

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  23. Found a pic of me among these pics... All the women were life savers, as our hands encouraged the soldiers, the youth of America. The guys we patched up and sent back to the war are the real heroes.The hardest thing I did was to push back my tears as "there was no crying " in Vietnam . Even so, we zipped body bags and cried...when we were alone, we cried.

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    1. Judy, Chuck Ward here from Vets With A Mission. Which photo is of you?

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  24. I was a peacetime medic with the Australian army; many of my training officers saw Vietnam service, and described the horrors of that war both on servicemen (and women) and on the Vietnamese people. They were all of one accord in praising the nurses who were deployed to all of the hospitals in Vietnam. God bless them all, their service was indispensable, and there is a special place in heaven for these wonderful ladies!

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  25. Ladies you did hell of job over there. Thank You for your service. Sgt John R. Greenaway, Fire Protection Specialist, U.S.A.F.

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  26. Thank you all for your sacrifice and service. You are the greatest.

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  27. Love every single one of these angels

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  28. Thanks to u a lot of us made it home❤️❤️❤️

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  29. Two times you all took great care of me...second time all the way back to CONUS. Thank you and God bless you ALL!

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  30. I want thanks all the nurses that service in Vietnam. I was one of the guys pathed me up and I was send back to the States. I was wounded Sept 22, 1968 in Dong Tam with the 9th Inf Div. All the nurses in Vietnam were angels and helping all the service men. Thank you.

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  31. God bless you all!!!πŸ’—πŸ™πŸ»πŸ’—

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  32. From an Aussie - God Bless you each and every one. Our "angels in jungle greens" <3

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  33. I was in the hospital for three days in QuiNhon and the Nurses were great. they made my tour there a lot nicer. They were brave women for being there and we could not of done our tour without them. you all know who you are. Thank you all for being there for us and got bless all of you!

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  34. i was at the 71st in pleiku God bless you all

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  35. My husband was hit twice on March 25, 1970. He was flown to a hospital unit and stitched up by an angel doctor and his nurse team. He spent 6 mos recuperating. God bless them all. He died ll10/21/19.

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  36. Nurse anesthetist, CuChi 68-69Would like too meet Nurse anesthetist in Vietnam

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  37. God Bless every one of you! Thanks for being there, a lot of us would not have made it out alive if it wasn't for you.

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  38. Without your dedicated skill and service many would have died and without your warmth and compassion many would have come home broken. Your service is and was greatly appreciated by those who needed it most. God Bless All you Ladies

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  39. Our "Angel's! We saw the results of our battles, "You" saw the results of all of our battles. God Bless you all!

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  40. To all these nurses who are the unsung heroes I salute you and thank you for your service. God Bless!

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  41. To the soldiers these nurses were the angels that took care of them. Thank you to all nurses who braved the war to take care of our wounded soldiers. You are all heroes in my eyes.

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  42. We’re you with the 12 Medivac in Cu Chi.
    Karl Petersen, Combat Medic 4/9th Charlie Company, Jan 68-Nov 68

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  43. April 1970, 95th Evac Hospital, Da Nang - 1Lt. Barbara Jean Smith, Columbia, SC. That was a long time ago and you are embedded deeply in my memory.

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  44. So many times our women soldiers, marines, sailors and fly-girls go without the recognition they so deserve and equally fought for...some paying the ultimate sacrifice too! Thank you ladie . Truly and Sincerely Thank You for your service and sacrifice!

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  45. God bless all of you fine ladies who were brave enough and had the heart to render your best to our best. You will never be forgotten...

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  46. This is my third chance at life. Birth, a VC mine in Oct '68, and a heart attack in 2018. I don't remember the first but remember well the second and third. Nurses were wonderful. I am especially grateful to the nurses at the 3rd Surgical Hospital in Dong Tam. In essence, I died and she brought me back. Thank you.

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  47. Angels of Vietnam. Got to see them work everyday. 498th Dust Off 70-71

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  48. I was one of these Army Nurses in Vietnam. 93rd Evac, Long Binh, Feb.'68- March'69. It was a privilege to serve and to care for those brave young men. Today I make quilts for homeless Veterans in MN. What a blessing it is for me.

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    1. I served as Chief Personnel Specialist for the Detachment HQfor the 93rd from 12Oct68~25Dec69. I am sure we crossed paths many times at the 93rd.

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    2. I am sure we did. That was so long ago but the memories are always with me. Thank you for your service !

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  49. Thank you all for your service! If you were near Cu Chi during Tet Offensive 1968 January 31 you may have cared for my brother.

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  50. God Bless each and every one of you brave souls!

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  51. Thank you, and may God Bless all you beautiful ladies.

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  52. These ladies saw the worst of the aftermath. Salute to you all.

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  53. They are all heros to the men and women who went to war.......

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  54. always with the forceps. 4/421st DustOff. 91A10

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  55. All the nurses at any time did the best they could and then some,God Bless each and every one of them,I was with 3rd Surg Evac Hosp. in Dong Tam 1966-1967,

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  56. I remember those that were in the 4th Division Base Camp.

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  57. We veterans AP-preciated your service and all you did for us. Those bouffant hairstyles and a few other personal quirks (e.g. white oval sunglasses) are endearing. I visited 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh to see crewmen burned and injured in helicopter crashes. I worked communications at the HHC of the 1st Aviation Brigade.

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  58. thank all you ladies who were there in VietNam for all the wounded men who needed you--you are indeed heroines--God bless you all--thank you all for your service

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  59. Thanks to all of you young ladies who tirelessly provided care and comfort to our fallen brothers. It meant more than you know. A Grunt 5/7 Cav 68-70

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  60. Great post. I used to work for a couple of hospitals. The nurses were wonderful people. Can't help but respect them.

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  61. The young lady pictured 3rd from the bottom says it all. We saw trauma on occasion. It must have been tough to see it day in and day out in the field hospitals. My best friend was a Doctor at Cu Chi and said he would have been overwhelmed if it wasn't for the Nurses, Tech's and Medics that helped. The nurse in that photo depicts what he said. You got to love a women who'd wear combat boots and a steel pot. 611th Trans Co. Vung Tau 10/62-63.

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  62. was in the Marines,never crossed paths with these girls, my guess is they' all got PTSD big time. You're in my prayers Ladies.

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  63. Thank You for remembering all of us & for all the caring comments. I volunteered to be where I would be most needed. I will always remember Vietnam as challenging, yet fulfilling. Our “boys” were so brave through it all. Medical Staff at both the 85th & 67th Evac Hospitals were awesome. So proud to have served with each.

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  64. I was in the Hospital in March 1968 at Plco. Moter rounds hit the bace the nurses didn't run a hide, they put the wounded under there beds where the sandbags would give them some protection. Now thats bravery. Thats what I call Amgel. Thanks to all of you

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  65. March 18, 1971 I "arrived" at the 24th EVAC hospital in bad shape. With the blood loss and heart stopping problems it took the OR people several hours to put me back together again. When I finally woke up the nurse had to inform me where I was and what had transpired over the last 18 hours. From that time forward I always had a nurse around me (if only I could have seen their face). Always caring always encouraging the nurses at the 24th EVAC were the BEST. They would always say ,didn't I know medics weren't suppose to get shot? After a while I was transferred to Camp Zama in Japan for skin grafting and other procedures. Weeks later off to Brooke Army Hospital. I will never be able to thank the doctors (Dr. Z) and the beautiful nurses of the 24th who not only saved my life they also showed me that I could make in the world when I got home. I will never forget the one nurse that kissed me goodbye when they put me on the chopper to the Air Base for my ride to Japan. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU.

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