Sunday, October 20, 2019

52 Incredible Photos Showing Life Inside Japanese Internment Camps in the United States During World War II



A Japanese family wearing identification tags waits to be relocated.1942



In 1942, when President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, the government justified the relocation of Japanese-Americans on the West Coast to internment camps as a "military necessity" to protect against domestic espionage and sabotage.

However,the government eventually admitted it "had in its possession proof that not one Japanese American, citizen or not, had engaged in espionage, not one had committed any act of sabotage."



Before relocation of Japanese-Americans began, the U.S. government froze the bank accounts of anyone born in Japan, raided homes despite not having search warrants, and allowed internees to bring only bedding and clothing to the camps.



Despite such violations of basic rights, Japanese internment was almost universally accepted by the American people.

The government never bothered to explain why Italian and German-Americans were not also sent to camps, and the military was not required or even pressured to provide concrete evidence that Japanese-Americans posed a threat to national security.



Here, a Yugoslavian farmer stands on the farm he took over from interned Japanese-Americans. Japanese internment gave white farmers a chance to eliminate unwanted competition. 



However, not all the camps were complete, so many Japanese-Americans were held for months in temporary holding centers, usually converted stables at local racetracks, like this one.







"Aside from the absurdity of living that way, life went on pretty much as usual," one internee said of life at the camps.

The residents set up newspapers, sports teams, and fire and police departments, though any community organization had to be approved by the War Relocation Authority.



While life may have gone on "as usual," the government also exploited internees as a source of labor.



Even the War Relocation Authority knew that they were subjecting the internees to abhorrent living conditions, writing that, “for the great majority of evacuated people, the environment of the centers – despite all efforts to make them livable – remains subnormal and probably always will.”



The water supply at the camps was no better than any of the other substandard accommodations. In fact, it notoriously wrought havoc on the health of the inmates.



In addition to physical ailments, the mental health of many Japanese-Americans suffered greatly as a result of their incarceration.











 Children at the Manzanar internment camp in California in 1943



























 Children at the Manzanar internment camp in California in 1943



Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Heart Mountain, Wyoming. 1943



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942



Manzanar Internment Camp, California, 1942












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